VIEW WHEELS ON CAR BEFORE YOU BUY. CAR BEFORE YOU BUY


VIEW WHEELS ON CAR BEFORE YOU BUY. 7 SPOKE SALEEN WHEELS



View Wheels On Car Before You Buy





view wheels on car before you buy






    wheels
  • steering wheel: a handwheel that is used for steering

  • A circular object that revolves on an axle and forms part of a machine

  • (wheel) change directions as if revolving on a pivot; "They wheeled their horses around and left"

  • Used in reference to the cycle of a specified condition or set of events

  • (wheel) a simple machine consisting of a circular frame with spokes (or a solid disc) that can rotate on a shaft or axle (as in vehicles or other machines)

  • A circular object that revolves on an axle and is fixed below a vehicle or other object to enable it to move easily over the ground





    view
  • See (a fox) break cover

  • Look at or inspect (something)

  • see: deem to be; "She views this quite differently from me"; "I consider her to be shallow"; "I don't see the situation quite as negatively as you do"

  • Watch (something) on television

  • position: a way of regarding situations or topics etc.; "consider what follows from the positivist view"

  • look at carefully; study mentally; "view a problem"





    car
  • A vehicle that runs on rails, esp. a railroad car

  • a wheeled vehicle adapted to the rails of railroad; "three cars had jumped the rails"

  • A railroad car of a specified kind

  • a motor vehicle with four wheels; usually propelled by an internal combustion engine; "he needs a car to get to work"

  • the compartment that is suspended from an airship and that carries personnel and the cargo and the power plant

  • A road vehicle, typically with four wheels, powered by an internal combustion engine and able to carry a small number of people





    buy
  • Obtain in exchange for payment

  • Procure the loyalty and support of (someone) by bribery

  • bargain: an advantageous purchase; "she got a bargain at the auction"; "the stock was a real buy at that price"

  • obtain by purchase; acquire by means of a financial transaction; "The family purchased a new car"; "The conglomerate acquired a new company"; "She buys for the big department store"

  • Pay someone to give up an ownership, interest, or share

  • bribe: make illegal payments to in exchange for favors or influence; "This judge can be bought"











rear view




rear view





About three months ago, my sister discovered this beautiful 1955 Dodge Jobline pick-up truck in a local Charleston newspaper. Knowing how much I'd always dreamed of owning a 1950's red pick-up, she rang to tell me about the listing and I located it online. We talked about how beautiful it was and of all the things we'd love to do with the truck, but the price was simply too high and over time, we soon forgot about her.

Then, about two weeks ago, our Granny passed away and I found myself back in S.C. for her burial. One day shortly after, with emotions still at an all-time high, my sister and I decided we would go kayaking where our Granny and Grandpa were born and raised. It would've been a great trip, except none of the weather forecasters had predicted the severe thunderstorms that ensued and we quickly found ourselves in need of alternative plans. What better to do than shop, right?

With our trip canceled, we found ourselves riding around Mt. Pleasant with a ridiculously large two-person kayak on our roof and "nothing" to do. I mentioned thinking it would be nice to go back and check out this 1960's “Endless Summer” type canary yellow station wagon we’d passed the day before, so we headed to the garage where it was parked. After perusing a wide array of vintage vehicles, we made out way to the garage and struck up a conversation with the mechanics. We inquired about some of the vintage vehicles and mentioned we’d found a red 1950’s red pick-up a few months back and asked if they’d ever seen one. They mentioned knowing of both a black and a white 1950's truck, but no red one. As the conversation neared the ? hour mark, one of the mechanics remembered he’d seen a red 1950’s pick-up parked at a law firm not far from the shop. As soon as he said this I thought (and my sister claims I said out loud), “That’s it!”.

After getting a few other places / people’s names who might know where to find a 1950’s pick-up, we took our chances and headed to see the truck the mechanic had mentioned seeing "a while back". We had nothing to lose by looking. As soon as we saw the vehicle and drove around the back-end, I knew it was the same one my sister had found three months prior. On the driver’s door window hung a sign advertising a slashed price and a phone number. After taking some photos and checking out the vehicle, my sister rang the listed number. We’d both just assumed the truck belonged to a man, so when a woman answered, she was surprised. After speaking for a few minutes, it became clear the voice at the other end was not going to “hand the phone over” (to a man). So, my sister asked, "Are you the owner?", to which the woman replied, "Yes!".

Needless to say, I think we were all a little surprised. The owner - Christine - explained she'd moved to Charleston from NYC to get into the bakery business and had bought the truck to "pick up men" – yes, that’s why she’d gotten it. At this juncture, my sister looked like she'd seen a ghost. There were several reasons for this "ook". One being, she’d been born in NY and two, her sister (that'd be me) currently lives there. Thirdly, she'd been trying to figure out how to transition out of a career in radio and was thinking of starting a baking business! I'm not kidding. When she asked Christine if owning the truck had indeed helped her meet any men, she said it hadn't, but that the truck had been rented quite a few times for photo shoots and commercials. Gears in our heads quickly began turning. And Christine was so happy that women were calling about the truck because she specifically wanted to sell the truck to a female. She told us to go into the offices and get the keys to go for a spin.

She’d also mentioned the mechanic who’d worked on the truck was close by and told us where to find his garage. After going in and speaking with a lovely woman who had some problem locating the keys, we went back outside to wait. After a few minutes, the keys arrived and the girl mentioned if we could wait, that the mechanic who’d worked on the vehicle would be coming by to pick both she and her Mum in a few minutes. Huh? Why?!? Because the mechanic was her father! When we heard this, it was like a bolt of lightening had struck. How was it possible the mechanic we’d just been told about and whom we were going to go visit would be coming to us? Things were just getting too weird, so, of course, we waited. It seemed kizmit was taking over at this juncture.

It had been a while since I’d driven a standard, though it’s been my main transmission for the majority of my driving years, so I wasn’t too worried. And, my sister had learned how to drive a standard shift on a tractor on someone’s farm, so between the two of us, we thought we’d be okay. Not long after, the mechanic arrived. If seemed the truck hadn’t been started in a while, so he had to jump-start her and we all piled in. He took us to a nearby car park and we drove a











ROAD TESTING THE FORD CONSUL CLASSIC 315 1961




ROAD TESTING THE FORD CONSUL CLASSIC 315 1961





BY JOHN B. BALL – ILLUSTRATED BRISTOL NEWS.

AT LAST THE ‘CLASSIC’, the latest contemporary and rather revolutionary Ford is here! The motoring public had waited so long for the medium-sized Ford car, that when it finally did come, it just had to be good, and good it is.

The line of the new Ford is in fact completely revolutionary and has only one similarity, that of the chopped-back rear window, to its smaller brother, the Anglia. The front end drops gracefully away from the raked windscreen, giving maximum aero-dynamic styling, and is dominated by the twin headlights, whilst the outstanding feature of the rear end is the folded back wings which are almost a miniature reproduction of those seen for many years on larger American cars. The overall impression, however, is quite delightful, for it successfully combines elegance with sports-like sleekness.

The model road-tested was the four-door deluxe with steering column change. Upon entering the car, I sat and looked around the instruments, and decor, before moving off. In the front, the divided bench seat is comfortable, and with the gear lever on the steering column could, if required, take three adults. In the rear, a first impression is that passengers would have little knee room, but on a further inspection and a trial, I found that this was not so, for the backs of the rear seats are curved to allow maximum comfort, and in fact three fully grown passengers did not find any cause for complaint on a 50 mile journey during the test.

Vision is of course excellent. The fully curved front screen with the raked pillars does not give any blind spots, whilst the whole of the rear end of the saloon is a flat glass screen. The unusually shaped rear doors incorporate triangular quarter-lights, and it is interesting to note that this type of window, when opened, gives a maximum amount of ventilation with a minimum amount of wind noise.

Before discussing the driving attributes, I should like to comment on one other point in the trim, and that is the door handles. One is at first rather inclined to be concerned by the apparent lack of this familiar feature, but the latest thing in safety design is the incorporation of an opening device which is placed out of sight and harm beneath the armrest. This is a particularly good point, for apart from removing one of the encumbrances on normal door panels, it is virtually impossible for children or adults alike to open any door unintentionally.

The dashboard facia is of the new modem all-in-a-row type. It is dominated at the top by a padded facia head, and can be broadly described as being divided into three sections. The furthest section from the driver is devoted to a glove compartment, whilst the centre panel contains heater, de-mister, choke, cigarette lighter and ashtray. The section immediately behind the wheel contains the speedometer, which sits evenly between the temperature and fuel gauges. Immediately to the right of this, the ignition and starter switch and screen wiper-washer controls and lights, are quite neatly grouped.

My only criticism on the instruments of this car was in fact the horn ring. I could only describe it as being not quite one thing or the other, for this type of control must surely be designed to be operated by the thumbs. The inner ring is placed almost evenly between the centre of the wheel and outside edge making it impossible to use the horn in this manner, therefore it does in fact necessitate lifting one hand from the steering wheel to operate the horn. This, I feel, is a very bad point, and indeed is completely unnecessary, although I will say that when the horn is actually operated the sound of the instrument is quite impressive.

After starting the car with a double turn of the ignition switch, the trigger-type handbrake is released with the left hand. First gear is selected by pulling the gear lever toward you and pushing up. As soon as the car begins to move you realise just what a lively little engine this new 1340 c.c. 56 b.h.p. engine is. Using the gears with discretion, I found that you can go up to 35 m.p.h. in second, 60 m.p.h. in third, and that in top gear a maximum speed of slightly in excess of 80 m.p.h. can be achieved. Before, however, we leave the matter of the gearbox,

I should like to pay tribute to the best form of gear column control I have ever encountered. In the past I have always been extremely suspicious of the linkage and amount of play in gear column controls, but in the case of this new ‘Classic’, I found that it was 100% positive, making operation very easy.

With the car moving briskly along the road, I became very pleasantly aware of the excellent suspension. Even when travelling at speeds between 70 and 80 m.p.h., there is little or no evidence of any pitch or roll, and this rather encourages one to take the car rather fast into a corner. It is when doing this that I think you will see, or in fact feel, the ‘Classic’ at its best. Its corne









view wheels on car before you buy







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